• by Jeffry Lindsay
    Copyright © 2004 by Jeff Lindsay

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    THIS BOOK WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE without the generous technical and spiritual help of Einstein and the Deacon. They represent what is best about Miami cops, and they taught me some of what it means to do this very tough job in a tougher place.
    I would also like to thank a number of people who made some very helpful suggestions, especially my wife, the Barclays, Julio S., Dr. and Mrs. A. L. Freundlich, Pookie, Bear, and Tinky.
    I am deeply indebted to Jason Kaufman for his wisdom and insight in shaping the book.
    Thanks also to Doris, the Lady of the Last Laugh.
    And very special thanks to Nick Ellison, who is everything an agent is supposed to be but almost never is.
    For Hilary
    who is everything to me

    CHAPTER 1
    MOON. GLORIOUS MOON. FULL, FAT, REDDISH moon, the night as light as day, the moonlight flooding down across the land and bringing joy, joy, joy. Bringing too the full-throated call of the tropical night, the soft and wild voice of the wind roaring through the hairs on your arm, the hollow wail of starlight, the teeth-grinding bellow of the moonlight off the water.
    All calling to the Need. Oh, the symphonic shriek of the thousand hiding voices, the cry of the Need inside, the entity, the silent watcher, the cold quiet thing, the one that laughs, the Moondancer. The me that was not-me, the thing that mocked and laughed and came calling with its hunger. With the Need. And the Need was very strong now, very careful cold coiled creeping crackly cocked and ready, very strong, very much ready now—and still it waited and watched, and it made me wait and watch.
    I had been waiting and watching the priest for five weeks now. The Need had been prickling and teasing and prodding at me to find one, find the next, find this priest. For three weeks I had known he was it, he was next, we belonged to the Dark Passenger, he and I together. And that three weeks I had spent fighting the pressure, the growing Need, rising in me like a great wave that roars up and over the beach and does not recede, only swells more with every tick of the bright nights clock.
    But it was careful time, too, time spent making sure. Not making sure of the priest, no, I was long sure of him. Time spent to be certain that it could be done right, made neat, all the corners folded, all squared away. I could not be caught, not now. I had worked too hard, too long, to make this work for me, to protect my happy little life.
    And I was having too much fun to stop now.
    And so I was always careful. Always tidy. Always prepared ahead of time so it would be right. And when it was right, take extra time to be sure. It was the Harry way, God bless him, that farsighted perfect policeman, my foster father. Always be sure, be careful, be exact, he had said, and for a week now I had been sure that everything was just as Harry-right as it could be. And when I left work this night, I knew this was it. This night was the Night. This night felt different. This night it would happen, had to happen. Just as it had happened before. Just as it would happen again, and again.
    And tonight it would happen to the priest.
    His name was Father Donovan. He taught music to the children at St. Anthonys Orphanage in Homestead, Florida. The children loved him. And of course he loved the children, oh very much indeed. He had devoted a whole life to them. Learned Creole and Spanish. Learned their music, too. All for the kids. Everything he did, it was all for the kids.
    Everything.
    I watched him this night as I had watched for so many nights now. Watched as he paused in the orphanage doorway to talk to a young black girl who had followed him out. She was small, no more than eight years old and small for that. He sat on the steps and talked to her for five minutes. She sat, too, and bounced up and down. They laughed. She leaned against him. He touched her hair. A nun came out and stood in the doorway, looking down at them for a moment before she spoke. Then she smiled and held out a hand. The girl bumped her head against the priest. Father Donovan hugged her, stood, and kissed the girl good night. The nun laughed and said something to Father Donovan. He said something back.
    And then he started toward his car. Finally: I coiled myself to strike and—
    Not yet. A janitorial service minivan stood fifteen feet from the door. As Father Donovan passed it, the side door slid open. A man leaned out, puffing on a cigarette, and greeted the priest, who leaned against the van and talked to the man.
    Luck. Luck again. Always luck on these Nights. I had not seen the man, not guessed he was there. But he would have seen me. If not for Luck.
    I took a deep breath. Let it out slow and steady, icy cold. It was only one small thing. I had not missed any others. I had done it all right, all the same, all the way it had to be done. It would be right.
    Now.
    Father Donovan walked toward his car again. He turned once and called something. The janitor waved from the doorway to the orphanage, then stubbed out his cigarette and disappeared inside the building. Gone.
    Luck. Luck again.
    Father Donovan fumbled for his keys, opened his car door, got into his car. I heard the key go in. Heard the engine turn over. And then—
    NOW.
    I sat up in his backseat and slipped the noose around his neck. One quick, slippery, pretty twist and the coil of fifty-pound-test fishing line settled tight. He made a small ratchet of panic and that was it.
    “You are mine now,” I told him, and he froze as neat and perfect as if he had practiced, almost like he heard the other voice, the laughing watcher inside me.
    “Do exactly as I say,” I said.
    He rasped half a breath and glanced into his rearview mirror. My face was there, waiting for him, wrapped in the white silk mask that showed only my eyes.
    “Do you understand?” I said. The silk of the mask flowed across my lips as I spoke.
    Father Donovan said nothing. Stared at my eyes. I pulled on the noose.
    “Do you understand?” I repeated, a little softer.
    This time he nodded. He fluttered a hand at the noose, not sure what would happen if he tried to loosen it. His face was turning purple.
    I loosened the noose for him. “Be good,” I said, “and you will live longer.”
    He took a deep breath. I could hear the air rip at his throat. He coughed and breathed again. But he sat still and did not try to escape.
    This was very good.
    We drove. Father Donovan followed my directions, no tricks, no hesitations. We drove south through Florida City and took the Card Sound Road. I could tell that road made him nervous, but he did not object. He did not try to speak to me. He kept both hands on the wheel, pale and knotted tight, so the knuckles stood up. That was very good, too.
    We drove south for another five minutes with no sound but the song of the tires and the wind and the great moon above making its mighty music in my veins, and the careful watcher laughing quietly in the rush of the nights hard pulse.
    “Turn here,” I said at last.
    The priests eyes flew to mine in the mirror. The panic was trying to claw out of his eyes, down his face, into his mouth to speak, but—
    “Turn!” I said, and he turned. Slumped like he had been expecting this all along, waiting for it forever, and he turned.
    The small dirt road was barely visible. You almost had to know it was there. But I knew. I had been there before. The road ran for two and a half miles, twisting three times, through the saw grass, through the trees, alongside a small canal, deep into the swamp and into a clearing.
    Fifty years ago somebody had built a house. Most of it was still there. It was large for what it was. Three rooms, half a roof still left, the place completely abandoned now for many years.
    Except the old vegetable garden out in the side yard. There were signs that somebody had been digging there fairly recently.
    “Stop the car,” I said as the headlights picked up the crumbling house.
    Father Donovan lurched to obey. Fear had sealed him into his body now, his limbs and thoughts all rigid.
    “Turn off the motor,” I told him, and he did.
    It was suddenly very quiet.
    Some small something chittered in a tree. The wind rattled the grass. And then more quiet, silence so deep it almost drowned out the roar of the night music that pounded away in my secret self.
    “Get out,” I said.
    Father Donovan did not move. His eyes were on the vegetable garden.
    Seven small mounds of earth were visible there. The heaped soil looked very dark in the moonlight. It must have looked even darker to Father Donovan. And still he did not move.
    I yanked hard on the noose, harder than he thought he could live through, harder than he knew could happen to him. His back arched against the seat and the veins stood out on his forehead and he thought he was about to die.
    But he was not. Not yet. Not for quite some time, in fact.
    I kicked the car door open and pulled him out after me, just to let him feel my strength. He flopped to the sandy roadbed and twisted like an injured snake. The Dark Passenger laughed and loved it and I played the part. I put one boot on Father Donovans chest and held the noose tight.
    “You have to listen and do as I say,” I told him. “You have to.” I bent and gently loosened the noose. “You should know that. Its important,” I said.
    And he heard me. His eyes, pounding with blood and pain and leaking tears onto his face, his eyes met mine in a rush of understanding and all the things that had to happen were there for him to see now. And he saw. And he knew how important it was for him to be just right. He began to know.
    “Get up now,” I said.
    Slowly, very slowly, with his eyes always on mine, Father Donovan got up. We stood just like that for a long time, our eyes together, becoming one person with one need, and then he trembled. He raised one hand halfway to his face and dropped it again.
    “In the house,” I said, so very softly. In the house where everything was ready.
    Father Donovan dropped his eyes. He raised them to me but could not look anymore. He turned toward the house but stopped as he saw again the dark dirt mounds of the garden. And he wanted to look at me, but he could not, not after seeing again those black moonlit heaps of earth.
    He started for the house and I held his leash. He went obediently, head down, a good and docile victim. Up the five battered steps, across the narrow porch to the front door, pushed shut. Father Donovan stopped. He did not look up. He did not look at me.
    “Through the door,” I said in my soft command voice.
    Father Donovan trembled.
    “Go through the door now,” I said again.
    But he could not.
    I leaned past him and pushed the door open. I shoved the priest in with my foot. He stumbled, righted himself, and stood just inside, eyes squeezed tight shut.
    I closed the door. I had left a battery lamp standing on the floor beside the door and I turned it on.
    “Look,” I whispered.
    Father Donovan slowly, carefully, opened one eye.
    He froze.
    Time stopped for Father Donovan.
    “No,” he said.
    “Yes,” I said.
    “Oh, no,” he said.
    “Oh, yes,” I said.
    He screamed, “NOOOO!”
    I yanked on the noose. His scream was cut off and he fell to his knees. He made a wet croaky whimpering sound and covered his face. “Yes,” I said. “Its a terrible mess, isnt it?”
    He used his whole face to close his eyes. He could not look, not now, not like this. I did not blame him, not really, it was a terrible mess. It had bothered me just to know it was there since I had set it up for him. But he had to see it. He had to. Not just for me. Not just for the Dark Passenger. For him. He had to see. And he was not looking.
    “Open your eyes, Father Donovan,” I said.
    “Please,” he said in a terrible little whimper. It got on my nerves very badly, shouldnt have, icy-clean control, but it got to me, whining in the face of that mess on the floor, and I kicked his legs out from under him. I hauled hard on the noose and grabbed the back of his neck with my right hand, then slammed his face into the filthy warped floorboards. There was a little blood and that made me madder.
    “Open them,” I said. “Open your eyes. Open them NOW. Look.” I grabbed his hair and pulled his head back. “Do as youre told,” I said. “Look. Or I will cut your eyelids right off your face.”
    I was very convincing. And so he did it. He did as he was told. He looked.
    I had worked hard to make it right, but you have to use what youve got to work with. I could not have done it at all if they had not been there long enough for everything to dry up, but they were so very dirty. I had managed to clean off most of the dirt, but some of the bodies had been in the garden a very long time and you couldnt tell where the dirt began and the body stopped. You never could tell, really, when you stop to think about it. So dirty—
    There were seven of them, seven small bodies, seven extra-dirty orphan children laid out on rubber shower sheets, which are neater and dont leak. Seven straight lines pointing straight across the room.
    Pointing right at Father Donovan. So he knew.
    He was about to join them.
    “Hail Mary, full of grace—” he started. I jerked hard on the noose.
    “None of that, Father. Not now. Now is for real truth.”
    “Please,” he choked.
    “Yes, beg me. Thats good. Much better.” I yanked again. “Do you think thats it, Father? Seven bodies? Did they beg?” He had nothing to say. “Do you think thats all of them, Father? Just seven? Did I get them all?”
    “Oh, God,” he rasped out, with a pain that was good to hear.
    “And what about the other towns, Father? What about Fayetteville? Would you like to talk about Fayetteville?” He just choked out a sob, no words. “And what about East Orange? Was that three? Or did I miss one there? Its so hard to be sure. Was it four in East Orange, Father?”
    Father Donovan tried to scream. There was not enough left of his throat for it to be a very good scream, but it had real feeling behind it, which made up for the poor technique. Then he fell forward onto his face and I let him snivel for a while before I pulled him up and onto his feet. He was not steady, and not in control. His bladder had let loose and there was drool on his chin.
    “Please,” he said. “I couldnt help myself. I just couldnt help myself. Please, you have to understand—”
    “I do understand, Father,” I said, and there was something in my voice, the Dark Passengers voice now, and the sound of it froze him. He lifted his head slowly to face me and what he saw in my eyes made him very still. “I understand perfectly,” I told him, moving very close to his face. The sweat on his cheeks turned to ice. “You see,” I said, “I cant help myself, either.”
    We were very close now, almost touching, and the dirtiness of him was suddenly too much. I jerked up on the noose and kicked his feet out from under him again. Father Donovan sprawled on the floor.
    “But children?” I said. “I could never do this to children.” I put my hard clean boot on the back of his head and slammed his face down. “Not like you, Father. Never kids. I have to find people like you.”
    “What are you?” Father Donovan whispered.
    “The beginning,” I said. “And the end. Meet your Unmaker, Father.” I had the needle ready and it went into his neck like it was supposed to, slight resistance from the rigid muscles, but none from the priest. I pushed the plunger and the syringe emptied, filling Father Donovan with quick, clean calm. Moments, only moments, and his head began to float, and he rolled his face to me.
    Did he truly see me now? Did he see the double rubber gloves, the careful coveralls, the slick silk mask? Did he really see me? Or did that only happen in the other room, the Dark Passengers room, the Clean Room? Painted white two nights past and swept, scrubbed, sprayed, cleaned as clean as can be. And in the middle of the room, its windows sealed with thick white rubberized sheets, under the lights in the middle of the room, did he finally see me there in the table I had made, the boxes of white garbage bags, the bottles of chemicals, and the small row of saws and knives? Did he see me at last?
    Or did he see those seven untidy lumps, and who knows how many more? Did he see himself at last, unable to scream, turning into that kind of mess in the garden?
    He would not, of course. His imagination did not allow him to see himself as the same species. And in a way, he was right. He would never turn into the kind of mess he had made of the children. I would never do that, could never allow that. I am not like Father Donovan, not that kind of monster.
    I am a very neat monster.
    Neatness takes time, of course, but its worth it. Worth it to make the Dark Passenger happy, keep him quiet for another long while. Worth it just to do it right and tidy. Remove one more heap of mess from the world. A few more neatly wrapped bags of garbage and my one small corner of the world is a neater, happier place. A better place.
    I had about eight hours before I had to be gone. I would need them all to do it right.
    I secured the priest to the table with duct tape and cut away his clothes. I did the preliminary work quickly; shaving, scrubbing, cutting away the things that stuck out untidily. As always I felt the wonderful long slow build to release begin its pounding throughout my entire body. It would flutter through me while I worked, rising and taking me with it, until the very end, the Need and the priest swimming away together on a fading tide.
    And just before I started the serious work Father Donovan opened his eyes and looked at me. There was no fear now; that happens sometimes. He looked straight up at me and his mouth moved.
    “What?” I said. I moved my head a little closer. “I cant hear you.”
    I heard him breathe, a slow and peaceful breath, and then he said it again before his eyes closed.
    “Youre welcome,” I said, and I went to work.
  • 昨天去三教上自习,接完水从二段走向一段,只见窗外一着校服裤子的附中人,现在学校里充斥着自主招生的高三学生,她身边还尾随家长两名,于是本人第一次没有BS校园里着校服的附中人,此时再定睛一看,那家长不是TBB么!!!!!!遂无比激动的冲出:“汤老师!!!!!”热切交谈ing~~~~~~~~~~~~~~当时书包里正背着微积分,TBB啊~~~饿会好好学数学的!!
    又到了自主招生的时候,看到这些小孩,就像看到了一年前的我,竟然已经一年过去了……看到其他学校很多人还在校师兄师姐接一下高三的学弟学妹,想我们去年也没人告诉我们找谁谁谁,今年也没谁谁谁要找我们~~~~~~
    自主招生还是要好好考的,在意想不到的时候她是一颗定心丸,我这是现身说法~~~~~~~~~~

    昨天晚上看了舞林大会,最twisty的是我在这一周才通过三联周刊知道了这档节目(好吧好吧~~~~我离中国电视就是这么远……)
    说实话,他们跳得可真不怎么地,基本上没什么步法,女的就靠舞伴而卖苦力举过头顶,男的~~~~~~~~~其实我觉得陈志朋跳得蛮好的(怎么说当年小虎队也是劲歌热舞的~~~~~~~~我们幼儿园老师还排过他们的歌,当时印象是蹦蹦跳跳的……我真的用了幼儿园这个词吗?!)
    国标国标~~~~~~~~~选课的时候人家问我选没选国标课,我和寻欢一致回答:“国标伤透了我的心~~~~~~~~~~”天杀的国标队~~~~~~~哎~~~~~但是饿确实很想学国标舞的说,还是假期去体育学院或者舞蹈学院看看罢,舞蹈学院那个我曾经战斗过的地方screen.width/2)this.style.width=screen.width/2;>

    下雪料,这个暖冬终于下雪了,2006年终于在最后有了点像样的雪screen.width/2)this.style.width=screen.width/2;>我记得去年也是在自主招生考试那天下了场雪(我一度认为烂桃迟到是因为下雪~~~~~~~~),估计现在学校里南方来的已经处于颠狂状态了。上次预报有雪的时候寻欢就high了一把,结果只下了薄薄一层,估计她老人家起床的时候雪都化了……screen.width/2)this.style.width=screen.width/2;>今天还在下,她可别激动得从六层掉下来……

    Quote of the day:
    Never try to tell everything you know. It may take too short a time.
                                                              ——Norman Ford
  • 今天骨干志愿者网上答题……答得太屎了~~~~~~~~啥都不会的说
    并且犯了一个巨大的错误,之前不应该去查不会的题的,而应该先答后面的,sigh~~~~~~~~~~~怎么说也是久经沙场了,竟然在此落马~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    不爽

    答题才发现本人的奥运知识小于等于零~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~sigh~~~~~~~~

    昨天下了Dexter,因为网上太多人推荐了,都被New York Times(好像是罢,记不清了,反正是风软上说的~~~~~~)评为今年十佳了,而且还有Six Feet Under的David~~~看了第一集,没有大多数人所叙述的那种感觉,可能是期待过高的原因~~~~~所谓的血腥~~~其实还好啦……
    Dexter加Criminal Minds,我真是快被变态杀人狂(还是叫Serial Killer罢~~~~~)包围了……
    Miami,这也应该是美国的特色城市了罢~~~~~~反正一切在NY进行的美剧都一定会强调This is NY,Friends啊,SATC啊(尤其强调Manhattan),Six Degrees啊,CSI:NY啊~~~~~~~~~~现在发现貌似Miami也是个需要特别强调的城市,阳光、泳装美女、游艇~~~~~~熟悉的CSI:Miami的感觉,当然也有不同,很大的不同,很多时候Dexter的画面相当昏暗,不象CSI:Miami总是亮的暖色调,连犯罪现场都有金色的阳光笼罩~~~~~Dexter很多情节发生在夜晚,Dexter杀人的地方当然更是——黑~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    准备再多看几集,反正第一季打包下全了
    前两天还下了Dantes Cove,发现第一季竟然只有两集,而每集竟然有一个多小时~~~~~~~~~~~~其实不喜欢神怪题材,不过似乎这只是其中一条线索,看看试试吧~~~~~~~~~~~

    风软上有这样一个帖:::URL::恶心死了~~~~又是抄袭,借鉴不是不可以,但不能这样照搬罢 target=_blank>http://www.1000fr.com/read-htm-tid-145267.html
    恶心死了~~~~又是抄袭,借鉴不是不可以,但不能这样照搬罢
    !!!!!向人家学习是学习人家的拍摄手法、敬业精神,武林外传学Friends就学得很好啊,那才是真正的学习,象这样照搬,天!!!!!!!!!!!恶心~~~~~~~~~~~这样下去,中国的电视剧永远没有出头之日!!没有原创就没有生命力,要抄的话,美剧可抄的东西多了(有本事抄越狱啊!!有本事把Alias copy到现在社会啊!!),但抄来抄去那永远是人家的东西,永远不是是真正的中国的原创力量
    他们可以欺骗广大的没有看过美剧的中国同胞,让他们欺骗去罢,我远离中国的电视很久了……(但是昨天依然下载了《大国崛起》)

    中午吃饭吃砂锅烫了舌头,疼~~~~~~~~~吃到后来都没感觉了……

    Quote of the day:
    Freedom of the press is limited to those who own one.
                                         ——A. J. Liebling
  • 我五体投地的那个帖,现在出答案了,饿答对了四个(原来那个并不是Will&Grace的说~~~~~而是Monk~~~~~~ )算是答得比较差的,高人大大的有啊!!!!沙发、八楼的超人全答对了,走召弓虽!!!!!!!!!还有若干答对十个以上的,弓虽!!!哎~~~这里很多都是今年的新剧,竟然都在追~~~~疯了……
    难道说,这就是传说中的骨灰级?!?!?!
    ::URL::
    Quote of the day:
    Things are only impossible until theyre not.
                   ——Jean-Luc Picard target=_blank>http://www.1000fr.com/read.php?tid=142587&fpage=0&toread=&page=1

    Quote of the day:
    Things are only impossible until theyre not.
                   ——Jean-Luc Picard
    , Star Trek: The Next Generation
  • 四年后本人可能会因为选修课没有修够学分而无法毕业……或者可能四年中要上13分无聊的选修课
    周一的黑暗时刻:“单击此处抽签”我单击,然后这门课就没了,上方红字显示“抱歉,您没有选中********”********可代表:德语(第二外语)、素描、东亚文化交流史
    由于必须要修两门文化素质核心课,而东亚文化交流史又是本人稍有兴趣的核心课(其他那些看着就觉得无聊……),如此一来,本人不得不再尝试抢其他核心课,当时竟然“西方文学思潮及作品”还有课余量(可想而知多无聊……),本人就选了……再加一门人少到不需要参加抽签的工业生态学……无聊啊~~~~~~~~~~连选修课都这么无聊~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    明年的三月九号,本人要拼RP!!!!补退选德语志在必得!!!排除万难我也要选上!!!!!!!
    为了那最终也没有抽上的东亚文化交流史,我还牺牲了会计学原理、《老子》和《庄子》、道家和玄学~~~现在这三门也都没课余了~~~~~~~~~~~~~~RP啊!!!!!!!!!!!!
    选课是我心中永远的痛……有人竟然可以选多少中多少,饿就一个都抽不中~~~~~~~~~~~~~sigh~~~~~~~~~

    Quote of the day:
    All secrets are deep. All secrets become dark, thats in the nature of secrets.
                                                       ——Cory Doctorow
  • 2006-12-24

    关于圣诞节

    我恨这个叫做圣诞的节
    我从没像今年这样恨过这个节

    先说别的
    经过两周的考察,经过两周不间断的热水供应,我们基本可以说:“紫荆通热水了”(鲜花ing,掌声ing,欢呼雀跃ing,万马奔腾ing)
    6字班可以改名叫福字班了~~~~~多年的热水问题终于在这一届解决了!!Yes!!!!!!!!!!!!screen.width/2)this.style.width=screen.width/2;>
    据娜娜姐说曾经学校的通讯上有幅漫画:1.一新生入学,高呼:“紫荆要通热水了”,之后两格就是此生不同年龄阶段,高呼:“紫荆要通热水了”,最后一个,此生拄拐,高呼:“紫荆要通热水了”
    如今那个要字终于消失了screen.width/2)this.style.width=screen.width/2;>

    昨天,本班在郭林班撮,本人又使起了高中时装醉的本事,但鉴于少了臭臭的肩膀,此次装醉由行为转向语言,并带动大批同志与饿一起装醉
    今天晚上环境系学生节,饿们班搞了个动作剧,其实主要是满足一下班里新生两对欲望~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    某something想今晚去本系挖MM,只能祝他好运了~~~~~~~~~~~~

    我恨圣诞节,我再次重申!!

    Quote of the day:
    Art is either plagiarism or revolution.
                          ——Paul Gauguin
  • 2006-12-22

    龌龊*WORM*龌母

    八成是我不认命都不行了

    上周上机课,我不过是笑了一下阿俊同学与小泉同学疑似BBM的行为,阿俊同学便说:“阁下便是龌母罢?”于是本人转向某Q,曰:“我杀了你!!!!!!”

    昨晚,熄灯后例行的龌龊时间,君君终于受不了了,曰:“琳姐你真是龌龊之母啊!!”本人从床上翻身而起:“我什么时候告诉过你这个?!”君君哑然,“难道我没说过?!”君君依然不知我所云,“那你为什么说我是‘龌龊之母’?!”君君曰:“我就是觉得你龌龊嘛,应该有个龌龊之王之类的,你又是女的,我就说你是龌龊之母咯~~~~~~~~~~~”于是本人只能哀叹:“宿命啊……我原来就是被叫做龌龊之母di~~~~~~~~简称龌母,由于种种原因还被叫worm,宿命啊~~~~~~~~~~~~~~”今天上机课又继续跟某Q哀叹:“人家100%原创竟然得出同样的结论啊~~~~~~~~~~~”

    宿命一词多年不用了……

    明天考四级,在二教那个地下有三层外墙都裂缝的地方……楼别塌啊……

    昨天上了最后一节线代习题,kun哥终于还是没再冲击记录,讲了30分钟,鉴于他开头结尾说了些关于考试的废话,基本上可以算25分钟,排第三了~~~~~~~15分钟的盛况是不会出现了
    小妹今天问kun哥昨天有什么临别告白,我说难道你还期望他泪眼婆娑么~~~~~~~~~你还是期望他判考卷的时候像判作业一样闭着眼睛给满分罢~~~~~~~kun哥昨天还问他每次给十分谁有意见,有意见就提~~~~~~~~~~~~
    今天微积分(I)最后一节习题课,助教说一般考试周的时候给大家复习的时间还是很充裕的,很明显他老人家并没有研究今年的考试安排~~~~考试周始于1月8日,微(I)的考试在1月9日上午,时间真是充裕啊~~~~~~~~~~~

    Quote of the day:
    I often quote myself. It adds spice to my conversation.
                                      ——George Bernard Shaw
  • 2006-12-20

    水平问题

    今天在风软看到这样一个帖,然后就五体投地了
    ::URL::本人只知最后一个是friends~~~~~~~~~第12个貌似VM,第3个可能是DH,第一个据我对人物形象的模糊记忆(因为没看过,只瞄过图片)有可能是House,第13可能是Will&Grace,看到so多人回答~~~~~太强了……太强了……
    五体投地ing......

    另外,这期的三联周刊大讲越狱、BT,哈哈哈哈哈 target=_blank>http://www.1000fr.com/read-htm-tid-142587.html
    本人只知最后一个是friends~~~~~~~~~第12个貌似VM,第3个可能是DH,第一个据我对人物形象的模糊记忆(因为没看过,只瞄过图片)有可能是House,第13可能是Will&Grace,看到so多人回答~~~~~太强了……太强了……
    五体投地ing......

    另外,这期的三联周刊大讲越狱、BT,哈哈哈哈哈
    !!!!!!!
    《越狱》在中国的隐秘流行
    开篇就相当搞笑:“美国人看《越狱》有如下选择:守着FOX电视网黄金时段看免费电视;用DVR录下来,第二天慢慢看;几天后到街角录像店租DVD看;网上BT下载;用iPod在iTunes商店花1.99美元,也就是一杯咖啡的价格付费观看一集……
    中国人看《越狱》也有如下选择:BT下载、电驴下载、FTP、校园网、局域网、美剧论坛、在线影院,当然,还有盗版DVD……”
    本人是BT族,不过估计将来在学校要用FTP了,反正学姐们都用FTP~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    据射手网统计,我所力挺的YDY是为PB 213最早发布中文字幕的,噢呵呵~~~~~~~~~~再次向所有字幕组工作人员致敬!!!!!!!!!!!!
    有人为即将引进的《越狱》去一个中文名,备选名字包括:《翻墙总动员》、《拯救大哥林肯》、《趟过狐狸河的男人们》、《画皮》……

    Quote of the day:
    There used to be a real me, but I had it surgically removed.
                           ——Peter Sellers
  • Davenport to retire after birth of first child  
    LONDON (Reuters) - Three-times grand slam tournament winner Lindsay Davenport has no plans to play tennis again after giving birth to her first child next year. 
    "I hate the word retirement but this season was such a struggle physically for me and I cant imagine playing again," Davenport told ESPN.com (www.espn.com). 
    The 30-year-old American missed most of 2006 with back problems before reaching the quarter-finals at the U.S. Open. 
    In her career, she has won the Australian Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open singles titles plus the 1996 Atlanta Olympics gold medal. Her 51 singles titles put her ninth on the all-time list. 
    Davenport began her professional career in 1993 and was one of the pioneers of the power game in womens tennis. 
    In the early stages, her strength was offset by a struggle with her weight but she devoted herself to fitness training and in 1998 won the first of her three majors by defeating top seed Martina Hingis 6-3 7-5 in the U.S. Open. 
    She beat Steffi Graf in the 1999 Wimbledon final and captured the Australian Open title in the following year. 
    Davenport struggled with injuries in 2002 but came back to win 13 tournaments in 2004 and 2005. Her loss to Venus Williams in last years Wimbledon final was the longest championship match in the tournaments history. 
    "I cant say theres any sadness, yet, about missing tennis. My life is with my husband and my future child," Davenport said. 
    "I feel like the second part of my life is about to begin, and I feel so lucky that if everything goes well, Im able to go out like this. The timing couldnt be better." 
    U.S. Fed Cup captain Zina Garrison said: "Im excited for her. Shes very family oriented, has a great, close-knit family. I dont think she would have any regrets. She can walk away knowing she gave her all." 这就是最重要的

    Updated on Thursday, Dec 14, 2006 7:36 am EST 
    小方不提我都不知道啊screen.width/2)this.style.width=screen.width/2;>我家又少一人~~~~~~~~~~~~~~其实Daven今年的样子也让人想到她会走了,唉…… 
    screen.width/2)this.width=screen.width/2; >
  • 2006-12-16

    Finally新系馆

    传说中的新系馆今天终于投入使用了(鉴于旁边还有各类工棚的东东,估计投入使用的只是小小报告厅一隅)
    早在刚入学时,系里面就给规划了十月份新系馆投入使用的美好蓝图,然后呢,现在是十二月……
    据说,在我们六字班没来之前,系里面流传的是暑假新系馆投入使用
    screen.width/2)this.width=screen.width/2; >
    其实系馆还是很漂亮的screen.width/2)this.style.width=screen.width/2;>
    screen.width/2)this.width=screen.width/2; >
    screen.width/2)this.width=screen.width/2; >
    screen.width/2)this.width=screen.width/2; >
    迎新的时候看过一个小片子讲这个节能楼如何节能,不过现在都不记得了,大概就是采光如何如何等等等等(汗,说了等于没说……)
    screen.width/2)this.width=screen.width/2; >
    由于角度原因,没有更全景的图了~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    其实系馆和本科生是没啥太大关系的,饿们就是跟着瞎热闹而已screen.width/2)this.style.width=screen.width/2;>

    Quote of the day:
    The limits of my language are the limits of my world.
                                             ——Ludwig Wittgenstein